Candido Camero father of the technique of coordinated independence

He was initially a multi-instrumentalist, showing ease on the tres, guitar and bass - key instruments in the popular Son music of the time. Proclaimed later, as the father of the coordinated independence technique, he had greater achievements. He has recorded with the most renowned jazzmen in the world. Candido's long list of recordings includes sessions with Lena Horne, Billy Taylor, Buddy Rich, Art Blakey, Count Basie, Elvin Jones, George Shearing, Lionel Hampton, Stan Getz, Wes Montgomery, Woody Herman, Doc Severinson, Marian McPartland, Lalo Schifrin. Mongo Santamaria, Tito Puente, Charlie Parker, and Antonio Carlos Jobim, in addition to several recordings as a leader. He was born in San Antonio de los Baños, Havana, April 22, 1921. His father taught him to play Tres at the age of eight. As a performer of this instrument, he joined Tata Gutiérrez's Gloria Habanera and Bolero Septet, 1935. A maternal uncle trained him in percussion, and before his 20th birthday he joined the Tropicana orchestra, under the direction of Mario Romeu. He accompanied the dance couple Carmen and Rolando, first in the Faraón cabaret, and later in 1946 in the United States. Machito introduced him to Dizzy Gillespie in 1950, and this one to Billy Taylor, with whom he worked for about two years in the New York Downbeat. Back in Havana, Cándido Camero and conguero Rolando Alfonso collaborated with pianist and composer Bebo Valdés in the creation of the batanga rhythm. He recorded with George Shearing in 1953, and that same year he replaced Jack Costanzo in Stan Kenton's orchestra: it was the beginning of an impressive career as a percussionist for almost all the great jazzmen of the time, with whom he occasionally alternated on the bongo. Ten years after arriving in the United States, he recorded the first of several solo albums for producer Creed Taylor and ABC/Paramount, with trumpeters Alfredo Armenteros (Chocolate), Art Farmer, Bennie Glow, Jimmy Nottingham, Ernie Royal, Charlie Shavers and Nick Travis; double bassists Oscar Pettiford and George Duvivier, drummer Charlie Persip; pianist Hank Jones; saxophonists Al Conh and Phil Woods; trombonist Jimmy Cleveland, and percussionists Chihuahua Martínez, Machito, Armando Peraza and Patato Valdés. In 2008 he was named along with Quincy Jones and four other musicians as the 2008 Master of Jazz by the National Endowment for the Arts (NEA).
Cándido Camero

“Percussionists Cycle at ISM”

Proclaimed later, as the father of the coordinated independence technique where he had greater achievements.

He was initially a multi-instrumentalist, showing ease on the tres, guitar and bass – key instruments in the popular Son music of the time.

Proclaimed later, as the father of the coordinated independence technique, he had greater achievements.

He was initially a multi-instrumentalist, showing ease on the tres, guitar and bass - key instruments in the popular Son music of the time. Proclaimed later, as the father of the coordinated independence technique, he had greater achievements. He has recorded with the most renowned jazzmen in the world. Candido's long list of recordings includes sessions with Lena Horne, Billy Taylor, Buddy Rich, Art Blakey, Count Basie, Elvin Jones, George Shearing, Lionel Hampton, Stan Getz, Wes Montgomery, Woody Herman, Doc Severinson, Marian McPartland, Lalo Schifrin. Mongo Santamaria, Tito Puente, Charlie Parker, and Antonio Carlos Jobim, in addition to several recordings as a leader. He was born in San Antonio de los Baños, Havana, April 22, 1921. His father taught him to play Tres at the age of eight. As a performer of this instrument, he joined Tata Gutiérrez's Gloria Habanera and Bolero Septet, 1935. A maternal uncle trained him in percussion, and before his 20th birthday he joined the Tropicana orchestra, under the direction of Mario Romeu. He accompanied the dance couple Carmen and Rolando, first in the Faraón cabaret, and later in 1946 in the United States. Machito introduced him to Dizzy Gillespie in 1950, and this one to Billy Taylor, with whom he worked for about two years in the New York Downbeat. Back in Havana, Cándido Camero and conguero Rolando Alfonso collaborated with pianist and composer Bebo Valdés in the creation of the batanga rhythm. He recorded with George Shearing in 1953, and that same year he replaced Jack Costanzo in Stan Kenton's orchestra: it was the beginning of an impressive career as a percussionist for almost all the great jazzmen of the time, with whom he occasionally alternated on the bongo. Ten years after arriving in the United States, he recorded the first of several solo albums for producer Creed Taylor and ABC/Paramount, with trumpeters Alfredo Armenteros (Chocolate), Art Farmer, Bennie Glow, Jimmy Nottingham, Ernie Royal, Charlie Shavers and Nick Travis; double bassists Oscar Pettiford and George Duvivier, drummer Charlie Persip; pianist Hank Jones; saxophonists Al Conh and Phil Woods; trombonist Jimmy Cleveland, and percussionists Chihuahua Martínez, Machito, Armando Peraza and Patato Valdés. In 2008 he was named along with Quincy Jones and four other musicians as the 2008 Master of Jazz by the National Endowment for the Arts (NEA).
Cándido Camero

He has recorded with the most renowned jazzmen in the world. Candido’s long list of recordings includes sessions with Lena Horne, Billy Taylor, Buddy Rich, Art Blakey, Count Basie, Elvin Jones, George Shearing, Lionel Hampton, Stan Getz, Wes Montgomery, Woody Herman, Doc Severinson, Marian McPartland, Lalo Schifrin. Mongo Santamaria, Tito Puente, Charlie Parker, and Antonio Carlos Jobim, in addition to several recordings as a leader.

He was born in San Antonio de los Baños, Havana, April 22, 1921. His father taught him to play Tres at the age of eight.

He was initially a multi-instrumentalist, showing ease on the tres, guitar and bass - key instruments in the popular Son music of the time. Proclaimed later, as the father of the coordinated independence technique, he had greater achievements. He has recorded with the most renowned jazzmen in the world. Candido's long list of recordings includes sessions with Lena Horne, Billy Taylor, Buddy Rich, Art Blakey, Count Basie, Elvin Jones, George Shearing, Lionel Hampton, Stan Getz, Wes Montgomery, Woody Herman, Doc Severinson, Marian McPartland, Lalo Schifrin. Mongo Santamaria, Tito Puente, Charlie Parker, and Antonio Carlos Jobim, in addition to several recordings as a leader. He was born in San Antonio de los Baños, Havana, April 22, 1921. His father taught him to play Tres at the age of eight. As a performer of this instrument, he joined Tata Gutiérrez's Gloria Habanera and Bolero Septet, 1935. A maternal uncle trained him in percussion, and before his 20th birthday he joined the Tropicana orchestra, under the direction of Mario Romeu. He accompanied the dance couple Carmen and Rolando, first in the Faraón cabaret, and later in 1946 in the United States. Machito introduced him to Dizzy Gillespie in 1950, and this one to Billy Taylor, with whom he worked for about two years in the New York Downbeat. Back in Havana, Cándido Camero and conguero Rolando Alfonso collaborated with pianist and composer Bebo Valdés in the creation of the batanga rhythm. He recorded with George Shearing in 1953, and that same year he replaced Jack Costanzo in Stan Kenton's orchestra: it was the beginning of an impressive career as a percussionist for almost all the great jazzmen of the time, with whom he occasionally alternated on the bongo. Ten years after arriving in the United States, he recorded the first of several solo albums for producer Creed Taylor and ABC/Paramount, with trumpeters Alfredo Armenteros (Chocolate), Art Farmer, Bennie Glow, Jimmy Nottingham, Ernie Royal, Charlie Shavers and Nick Travis; double bassists Oscar Pettiford and George Duvivier, drummer Charlie Persip; pianist Hank Jones; saxophonists Al Conh and Phil Woods; trombonist Jimmy Cleveland, and percussionists Chihuahua Martínez, Machito, Armando Peraza and Patato Valdés. In 2008 he was named along with Quincy Jones and four other musicians as the 2008 Master of Jazz by the National Endowment for the Arts (NEA).
Cándido Camero

As a performer of this instrument, he joined Tata Gutiérrez’s Gloria Habanera and Bolero Septet, 1935.

A maternal uncle trained him in percussion, and before his 20th birthday he joined the Tropicana orchestra, under the direction of Mario Romeu.

He accompanied the dance couple Carmen and Rolando, first in the Faraón cabaret, and later in 1946 in the United States.

Machito introduced him to Dizzy Gillespie in 1950, and this one to Billy Taylor, with whom he worked for about two years in the New York Downbeat.

Back in Havana, Cándido Camero and conguero Rolando Alfonso collaborated with pianist and composer Bebo Valdés in the creation of the batanga rhythm. He recorded with George Shearing in 1953, and that same year he replaced Jack Costanzo in Stan Kenton’s orchestra: it was the beginning of an impressive career as a percussionist for almost all the great jazzmen of the time, with whom he occasionally alternated on the bongo.

He was initially a multi-instrumentalist, showing ease on the tres, guitar and bass - key instruments in the popular Son music of the time. Proclaimed later, as the father of the coordinated independence technique, he had greater achievements. He has recorded with the most renowned jazzmen in the world. Candido's long list of recordings includes sessions with Lena Horne, Billy Taylor, Buddy Rich, Art Blakey, Count Basie, Elvin Jones, George Shearing, Lionel Hampton, Stan Getz, Wes Montgomery, Woody Herman, Doc Severinson, Marian McPartland, Lalo Schifrin. Mongo Santamaria, Tito Puente, Charlie Parker, and Antonio Carlos Jobim, in addition to several recordings as a leader. He was born in San Antonio de los Baños, Havana, April 22, 1921. His father taught him to play Tres at the age of eight. As a performer of this instrument, he joined Tata Gutiérrez's Gloria Habanera and Bolero Septet, 1935. A maternal uncle trained him in percussion, and before his 20th birthday he joined the Tropicana orchestra, under the direction of Mario Romeu. He accompanied the dance couple Carmen and Rolando, first in the Faraón cabaret, and later in 1946 in the United States. Machito introduced him to Dizzy Gillespie in 1950, and this one to Billy Taylor, with whom he worked for about two years in the New York Downbeat. Back in Havana, Cándido Camero and conguero Rolando Alfonso collaborated with pianist and composer Bebo Valdés in the creation of the batanga rhythm. He recorded with George Shearing in 1953, and that same year he replaced Jack Costanzo in Stan Kenton's orchestra: it was the beginning of an impressive career as a percussionist for almost all the great jazzmen of the time, with whom he occasionally alternated on the bongo. Ten years after arriving in the United States, he recorded the first of several solo albums for producer Creed Taylor and ABC/Paramount, with trumpeters Alfredo Armenteros (Chocolate), Art Farmer, Bennie Glow, Jimmy Nottingham, Ernie Royal, Charlie Shavers and Nick Travis; double bassists Oscar Pettiford and George Duvivier, drummer Charlie Persip; pianist Hank Jones; saxophonists Al Conh and Phil Woods; trombonist Jimmy Cleveland, and percussionists Chihuahua Martínez, Machito, Armando Peraza and Patato Valdés. In 2008 he was named along with Quincy Jones and four other musicians as the 2008 Master of Jazz by the National Endowment for the Arts (NEA).
Cándido Camero

Ten years after arriving in the United States, he recorded the first of several solo albums for producer Creed Taylor and ABC/Paramount, with trumpeters Alfredo Armenteros (Chocolate), Art Farmer, Bennie Glow, Jimmy Nottingham, Ernie Royal, Charlie Shavers and Nick Travis; double bassists Oscar Pettiford and George Duvivier, drummer Charlie Persip; pianist Hank Jones; saxophonists Al Conh and Phil Woods; trombonist Jimmy Cleveland, and percussionists Chihuahua Martínez, Machito, Armando Peraza and Patato Valdés.

In 2008 he was named along with Quincy Jones and four other musicians as the 2008 Master of Jazz by the National Endowment for the Arts (NEA).

He was initially a multi-instrumentalist, showing ease on the tres, guitar and bass - key instruments in the popular Son music of the time. Proclaimed later, as the father of the coordinated independence technique, he had greater achievements. He has recorded with the most renowned jazzmen in the world. Candido's long list of recordings includes sessions with Lena Horne, Billy Taylor, Buddy Rich, Art Blakey, Count Basie, Elvin Jones, George Shearing, Lionel Hampton, Stan Getz, Wes Montgomery, Woody Herman, Doc Severinson, Marian McPartland, Lalo Schifrin. Mongo Santamaria, Tito Puente, Charlie Parker, and Antonio Carlos Jobim, in addition to several recordings as a leader. He was born in San Antonio de los Baños, Havana, April 22, 1921. His father taught him to play Tres at the age of eight. As a performer of this instrument, he joined Tata Gutiérrez's Gloria Habanera and Bolero Septet, 1935. A maternal uncle trained him in percussion, and before his 20th birthday he joined the Tropicana orchestra, under the direction of Mario Romeu. He accompanied the dance couple Carmen and Rolando, first in the Faraón cabaret, and later in 1946 in the United States. Machito introduced him to Dizzy Gillespie in 1950, and this one to Billy Taylor, with whom he worked for about two years in the New York Downbeat. Back in Havana, Cándido Camero and conguero Rolando Alfonso collaborated with pianist and composer Bebo Valdés in the creation of the batanga rhythm. He recorded with George Shearing in 1953, and that same year he replaced Jack Costanzo in Stan Kenton's orchestra: it was the beginning of an impressive career as a percussionist for almost all the great jazzmen of the time, with whom he occasionally alternated on the bongo. Ten years after arriving in the United States, he recorded the first of several solo albums for producer Creed Taylor and ABC/Paramount, with trumpeters Alfredo Armenteros (Chocolate), Art Farmer, Bennie Glow, Jimmy Nottingham, Ernie Royal, Charlie Shavers and Nick Travis; double bassists Oscar Pettiford and George Duvivier, drummer Charlie Persip; pianist Hank Jones; saxophonists Al Conh and Phil Woods; trombonist Jimmy Cleveland, and percussionists Chihuahua Martínez, Machito, Armando Peraza and Patato Valdés. In 2008 he was named along with Quincy Jones and four other musicians as the 2008 Master of Jazz by the National Endowment for the Arts (NEA).
Cándido Camero